How smoking affects women’s health

Posted by CarePoint Health on Dec 14, 2015 1:00:00 PM

Smoking is harmful to your health, no matter who you are. But for women, the history of smoking — and how it affects women’s health today — is a worrisome trend.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), smoking rates — and smoking-related deaths — among women have continued to rise over the last 50 years. In the 1960s, smoking among men decreased when some of the health dangers of smoking became well-known. But shortly after that happened, cigarettes became heavily marketed to women, with slimmer designs and feminine packaging. Many women were led to believe that smoking would help them lose weight. In the years that followed, the number of women who smoked began to rise dramatically, and the numbers never came back down.

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Topics: OBGYN, Women's health, Health, Smoking

How secondhand smoke harms your health

Posted by CarePoint Health on Oct 15, 2015 11:00:00 AM

Twenty years ago, it was common to see — and smell — people smoking in public places like restaurants, bars, and even workplaces. Although there is no federal ban on public smoking, most states now have strict laws against smoking in designated public places.

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Topics: Health, Children's Health, Primary care, Smoking, Neighborhood health center

6 common things that can make PMS worse

Posted by CarePoint Health on Oct 9, 2015 1:00:00 PM

Many women don’t need a calendar to know when their next menstrual cycle is coming; they can feel it. Because of premenstrual syndrome, or PMS, many women can predict when their period is coming based on bothersome — and often difficult — emotional or physical changes that occur every month like clockwork.

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Topics: OBGYN, Women's health, Nutrition, Health, Smoking, Sleep

Lower your risk of stroke

Posted by CarePoint Health on Jun 10, 2015 11:00:00 AM

A stroke can be devastating to an individual and his or her family. A stroke, or “brain attack,” occurs when blood supply to the brain is interrupted by a clot or hemorrhage. When the supply is cut off, even for a few minutes, brain cells begin to die. The longer the blood supply is lost, the higher the chance of disability and death.

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Topics: Heart health, Heart stroke, Smoking